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Volume 31, Issue 1, 2020

Co-Editors: Bob Ives and Rod E. Case

ISSN: 2637-8965

Identifying Discrepancies between Student Technology Expectations and Current Resources

Lisa Parriott, Peru State College
Sheri Grotrian, Perus State College
Brad Griffin, Perus State College
Rozlyn Cole, Perus State College
Sara Granfors, Peru State College
Ashli Becker, Perus State College

Abstract: This paper is an investigation into the technologies necessary to support the academic success of students entering college classrooms. Students beginning college bring a variety of technologies to campus and have varied expectations as to what the college will or should provide. This research seeks to discover the technology students own, expect, and need to successfully participate in academic courses. Furthermore, this research seeks to identify relevant gaps and determine the technology resources that are necessary for colleges to fund in order to provide equitable learning for success of students of all socioeconomic levels.

Reference: Parriott, L., Grotrian, S., Griffin, B., Cole, R., Granfors, S. & Becker, A. (2020). Identifying Discrepancies between Student Technology Expectations and Current Resources. Educational Research: Theory and Practice, 31(1), 1-6.

Relationship Building Across Transcultural Lines for Transformation in Teachers’ Identities and Classroom Practices

Jean Kirshner, Colorado State University
George Kamberelis, Western Colorado University

Abstract: This participatory action research involved Belizean and American educators engaged in professional development work that became increasingly collaborative. First, we describe early focus on resources and teaching strategies. Next, we discuss shifting to a more participatory, dialogic approach. We then explain how intentional engagement in Freirean dialogue, sharing life stories and sharing lifeworlds led to transformations in identities and practices. Finally, we discuss relevance of our work for transcultural professional development work.

Reference: Irshner, J. & Kamberelis, G. (2020). Relationship building Across Transcultural Lines for Transformation in Teachers’ Identities and Classroom Practices. Educational Research: Theory and Practice, 31(1), 7-15.

Examining Student Teacher Reflection using Video-based, Structured Reflection Procedures

Leona Calkins, University of Nevada, Las Vegas
Peter Wiens, University of Nevada, Las Vegas
Lois Paretti, University of Nevada, Las Vegas
Linda Quinn, University of Nevada, Las Vegas

Abstract: This study was designed to investigate the implementation of a video-based reflection requirement in a teacher education program designed to support social studies student teachers’ growth as teachers. The data included videos from twelve undergraduate preservice teachers earning a teaching license in secondary social studies. In total 37 videos were uploaded to an online system and analyzed. A rubric, designed by university faculty, was used for coding. Lecture format was the most commonly used instructional strategy with only five of the videos showcasing a different, primary instructional strategy. Student teachers also most commonly recorded the beginning portion of class which tended to show the end of a warm-up/bell ringer and the transition into lecture. Because videos showed similar instructional styles and portions of class, evidence of growth was limited. However, those student teachers who took the video reflections seriously did show growth and were able to learn from and adjust their instruction by reflecting on their previous recordings.

Reference: Calkins, L., Wiens, P., Paretti, L. & Quinn, L. (2020). Examining Student Teacher Reflection using Video-based, Structured Reflection Procedures. Educational Research: Theory and Practice, 31(1), 16-21.

A Content Analysis of Coaching Novice Teachers

Michelle Arroyo, University of Nevada, Las Vegas
Linda F. Quinn, University of Nevada, Las Vegas
Lois Paretti, University of Nevada, Las Vegas
Jane McCarthy, University of Nevada, Las Vegas

Abstract: Coaching interactions among 13 new teachers and seven experienced teachers are analyzed to examine the support requested by novice teachers and the support they received from visits to their classrooms by experienced teachers. Comments from new teachers and coaches were organized into general themes and categories related to instruction and management identifying differences between the new teachers’ and coaches’ concerns.

Reference: Arroyo, M., Quinn, L. F., Paretti, L. & McCarthy, J. (2020). A Content Analysis of Coaching Novice Teachers. Educational Research: Theory and Practice, 31(1), 22-25.

PhotoVoice: An Innovative Qualitative Method in Research and Classroom Teaching

Lori J. O’Malley, Rogers State University
Sonya E. Munsell, Rogers State University

Abstract: The purpose of this workshop was to inform participants of the multiple uses of a qualitative research method called Photovoice. Both presenters have utilized this method extensively in their own academic research, in their research methods courses, and in their non- research related courses. In this method, participants are provided with a series of questions (or topics) and asked to take photographs that capture their responses to these questions/topics. Once these photographs have been taken, participants meet with researchers/instructors to discuss the photographs in a semi-structured or focus group format. Photovoice allows participants to take an active role in research and allows their perspectives to be visually displayed for enhanced discussion.

Reference: O’Malley, L. J. & Munsell, S. E. (2020). PhotoVoice: An Innovative Qualitative Method in Research and Classroom Teaching. Educational Research: Theory and Practice, 31(1), 26-32.

Preliminary Findings from a Pilot Intervention to address Academic Misconduct among First-year College Students

Jed Locquiao, University of Nevada, Reno
Bob Ives, University of Nevada, Reno

Abstract: This study examined academic misconduct knowledge and motivations of first-year college students enrolled in a major Western U.S. public university. Data involved student responses to online prompts. Several findings emerged. First, students started college with gaps in knowledge on citations/references, test/assignment cheating, and the nature of academic integrity, despite higher education institutions’ (HEIs) elevated scrutiny on students adhering to academic conventions and ethics. Second, the great majority of students cited extrinsic motivations with going to college. Results speak to the relevancy of HEI programs that explicitly instructs new students in academic misconduct topics (e.g., definitions, procedures, and consequences). And results suggest that such programs might yield more efficient lasting lessons by stressing the tangible instrumental costs of academic misconduct (e.g. financial costs, work prospects, and social disapproval).

Reference: Locquiao, J. & Ives, B. (2020). Preliminary Findings from a Pilot Intervention to Address Academic Misconduct among First-year College Students. Educational Research: Theory and Practice, 31(1), 33-45.

Your Students are Cheating More Than You Think They Are. Why?

Bob Ives, University of Nevada, Reno

Abstract: Neutralization Theory proposes that when people engage in behavior that they know is not approved by society, they neutralize, or justify, their behavior by applying one or more of several neutralization techniques In this report we use data from a study that investigated self- reported reasons for academic misconduct from post-secondary students in Romania. We found that students offered reasons that range widely, and well beyond the options included in Neutralization Theory. Factor analysis of the responses also lead to the conclusion that reasons for committing academic misconduct may be unidimensional.

Reference: Ives, B. (2020). Your Students are Cheating More Than You Think They Are. Why? Educational Research: Theory and Practice, 31(1), 46-53.

Conducting a Mock Faculty Panel Interview

Darolyn Seay, Peru State College
Robert Ingram, Peru State College

Abstract: This conference proceeding paper regarding the presentation made at the NRMERA 2019 conference focused on the purpose to develop candidates who possess dispositions so that they will be successful in the classroom. This presentation included a mock panel interview including four undergraduate teacher candidates as the participants along with two education faculty members. The panel interview demonstrated to the audience the format, the physical arrangement, professional dispositions and dress, and questions strategically developed identifying 4 major human attributes: Verbal and Listening, professionalism, and human interaction.

Reference: Seay, D. & Ingram, R. (2020). Conducting a Mock Faculty Panel Interview. Educational Research: Theory and Practice, 31(1), 54-56.

The Future of School Social Work: Providing Leadership Through Restorative Justice Coordination

M. Scott, Abilene Christian University
B. Jones, Colorado State University
T. Cavanagh, Colorado State University
P. L. Metas Vigil, Colorado State University
L. Pointer, Victoria University of Wellington

Abstract: As the use of restorative practices in schools spreads across the country, school social workers are increasingly asked to take a leadership role in responding restoratively to wrongdoing and conflict and coaching teachers and administrators in restorative practices. Because of their understanding of the importance of relationships and relevant skills and training, social workers are a well-positioned to lead restorative justice implementation efforts. In order to fill this role, we argue that social workers need a specific training on restorative justice practices relevant to their work and educational background. This article reviews the existing literature on the role of social workers in implementing restorative practices in schools and provides an overview of the method and findings of a study investigating what a restorative justice training specific to social workers would involve. A summary of the resulting recommended curriculum is also provided. The conclusion explores the importance of this study and suggests areas for further research.

Reference: Scott, M., Jones, B., Cavanagh, T., Metas Vigil P. L. & Pointer, L. (2020). The Future of School Social Work: Providing Leadership Through Restorative Justice Coordination. Educational Research: Theory and Practice, 31(1), 57-62.

How Race Can Impact Our Writing Self-Efficacy in College Composition

Paris Ryan, San Diego Community College District

Abstract: This study focused on how race impacts a student’s perception and success in a community college composition course. The purpose was to uncover the factors that led to successful writers with a focus in self-efficacy and writing. The study used a quantitative research method to analyze the research question.

Reference: Ryan, P. (2020). How Race Can Impact Our Writing Self-Efficacy in College Composition. Educational Research: Theory and Practice, 31(1), 63-66.

The Perceptions of Wyoming Principals to Predict Superintendent Motivating Language Use: A Blockwise Regression Study

William T. Holmes, University of Wyoming
Michele A. Parker, University of North Carolina Wilmington

Abstract: This 2019 NRMERA conference proceeding shares the results of a blockwise regression study focused on the degree to which the Motivating Language Antecedents [Behavioral Integrity and Source Credibility Dimensions – Competence, Goodwill, and Trustworthiness] predict superintendent’s Motivating Language use based upon the preceptions of their principals through the lens of Motivating Language Theory as the foundation for superintendent talk. Significant results from this study indicate that principals prioritize superintent goodwill as a necessary primary precursor over competence and prioritize the dimensions of source credibility before behavioral integrity thus supporting a redefinition of superintendent credibility from the current research field.

Reference: Holmes, W. T. & Parker, M. A. (2020). The Perceptions of Wyoming Principals to Predict Superintendent Motivating Language Use: A Blockwise Regression Study. Educational Research: Theory and Practice, 31(1), 68-77.

Design Thinking, Ethnography, and the Red Team Approach to Involving Undergraduate Students in Research

Kyle Ryan, Peru State College
Julia Zurek, Peru State College
Kelsi Leininger, Peru State College
Kaitlyn McNeil, Peru State College
Olivia Welch, Peru State College

Abstract: This paper explores the revision of an existing Honors Program (HP) that includes the possible creation of a first-year, second semester course. Inherent in this course is the premise of Design Thinking (DT) that provided the students the opportunity to not only design the course, but to also implement Design Thinking in order to create an initiative that would leave a lasting impact on the campus or surrounding community. Inherent to this initiative is the use of Red Teaming (RT) that allows students the opportunity to employ both ethnographic and critical thinking skills.

Reference: Ryan, R., Zurek, J., Leininger, K., McNeil, K. & Welch, O. (2020). Design Thinking, Ethnography, and the Red Team Approach to Involving Undergraduate Students in Research. Educational Research: Theory and Practice, 31(1), 78-80.


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